DIY 24″ Plyometric Box

(This box jump photo is a little weird with four legs in the frame!!) At any rate, this post for a DIY 24″ Plyo Box has been in my queue and it’s about time I post it.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

I have to be honest: I don’t love box jumps. I don’t. I get frustrated when I fail to get in a jumping rhythm by my third consecutive jump. But, I do love how it gets my heart rate up faster than a cheetah on crack. Plus, the movement transfers well to my sports and it gives the equivalent of a Brazilian bedonkadonk lift.

I can’t take full credit for this DIY. It was inspired by a variety of plans floating around the interweb, like this one HERE. This plan is nothing new, I’ve just merely tried to put it in an easily understandable format. There are two versions of the plyo, the rectangular type that can be turned on different sides for different heights, or the “tapered” kind I have here. The rectangular kinds are a bit more bulky, heavier, and less structurally sound (so I hear) but they are easier to build. The type featured here requires beveling for a structurally sound plyo box and it’s easier to handle (although it cannot be used at varying heights.) Special thanks to this guy for all the help and advice.

(Here is the usual disclaimer. DIY at your own risk. I am not responsible for any injuries (or death?) acquired by following the content of this post.) Now, let’s DO THIS!!

(Download the printable PDF of materials and equipment here.) Materials and equipment needed:

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

 

I recommend using a table saw for this project. I don’t have the garage space for a table saw (or the liberal budget) but I was able to rent one from a community tool library. You can search Tool Libraries in your state here. Boulder, CO has an awesome one that we frequent.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Set your saw blade at a 10 degree angle and cut your sheet of plywood along the horizontal midline (refer to diagram below.)
  2. Now bevel cut, at the same 10 degree angle, the remaining long edges (corresponding to the tops and bottoms of each piece.) NOTE: Bevel cut each edge at the same angle and same perspective. If you mess this part up, you’re screwed. :)

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

3.  Reset your blade back to 90 degrees (straight up and down) and make the cuts for the sides of each piece. You should now have 4 sides of your box with ONLY the top and bottom edges beveled.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

4. Use a jigsaw to drill holes for handles, if desired.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

5. Now that we have all four sides of our plyo box, assemble it.  Make sure you are on a level surface and using some clamps, ensure that the sides fit snugly together.  (If they don’t, now is the time to sand off any parts that are keeping it from fitting tightly.) Place a bead of wood glue along the two edges that are to be joined and glue the sides together.

6. Predrill your holes with the 3/8” wood drill bit. You’ll want to predrill so that the plywood does not split when you screw the sides together.

7. Using the wood screws, screw into the predrilled holes until tight (don’t overtighten or the wood may split.)

8. Continue for all sides of the remaining pieces.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

9. Now we can cut out the top. I saved this part for last to ensure that I get an exact size for the top and that the box is stable enough. Flip the partially completed box upside down on the remaining sheet of plywood.  Trace out the size and shape of the top.

10. Set the blade angle back to 10 degrees and cut out the top. Make sure your saw blade is cutting “into” the wood while you follow your drawn lines so that the edges of the top slant inward.

11. Assemble the top by placing a bead of wood glue around the edge where it will contact the sides and glue the top to the box.

12. Using the 3/8″ drill bit, pre-drill at least 3 holes on each side and screw the top in place with wood screws.

Girl Walks Into A Bar(bell)

13. Sand it down with a sander! Pay special attention to all the edges and the handles unless you like splinters.

14. You can now varnish or paint your plyo box and even place a rubber mat on the top.

Done! Jump around! Jump around! Jump up, jump up, and get down.

-jess

Comments

  1. Nice explanation Jess, and thanks for the shout out. Definitely an essential item for the garage gym and one of the first DIY’s any garage gymer should tackle, IMO.

    It’s always tough to explain or think about the “bevels” for the pieces but that one picture you put up showing how each piece should sit flush against the floor while sitting at an angle is key. Someone wrote a tip on one of the forums I looked through when we were about to build our first boxes that really helped. ” Cut from the same side of the plywood sheet in the same direction every time and the bevels should work themselves out.”

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